Author: Purepost (page 1 of 2)

2020 Reading List

A new year and decade have begun. Many of us are designing our 2020-setting goals and resolutions, picking a word to live by, and creating to-do lists. Maybe one of your to-do lists is a reading list. To recognize the tradition of setting goals for the new year, the team at Purepost would like to share their top personal and professional growth books to inspire you in 2020. Continue reading

How to Obtain your DD214 or Army ORB / Army ERB

These instructions will be helpful to anyone needing:

  • An electronic copy of your DD214
  • An electronic of your Army ORB or Army ERB

If that’s you, read on! Continue reading

The Why of The Purepost Skills Translation Method

We’ve Walked in Your Boots

Have you ever been to a Military resume builder or translation website and the system tells you that your Military position doesn’t transfer? We’ve seen it and we’ve experienced it. That feeling you had of “what do you mean?”, is understood and felt here at Purepost.

My father Tony Garcia, Sr. and I are Veterans. Tony experienced the Military transition challenge in 1993, when he retired as a LTC. I did later in 2007.

We got fed up with the current “bad solutions” and decided to make something that works for all Veterans and Service Members. Continue reading

When to Apply for Jobs: best & worst times

As a member of the U.S. Military, there is a PCS pattern that occurs around the May to August timeframe. In some cases, you could be transitioning out of the Army during these peak times.

Starting your career exploration before your last day in the Army is vital to landing a job at the right time. Depending on the industry you choose to enter, certain times of year might not be the best hiring season for a company. As you review these dates, start planning ahead – it’s never too early to apply for a job. Continue reading

Veterans in Recruiting Funnels

How do Veterans fit into a Civilian Recruiting Funnel?

Veterans are no strangers to strategy, models, organizational structures, and formal processes focused on goals or outcomes. Whether this brings any comfort or not, the civilian world does function very similarly in that capacity, especially in the job selection and recruiting arenas.

(The Army actually utilizes a version of a recruiting funnel for its own recruiting and selection process too.)

So what is a recruiting funnel? Continue reading

Know Where You Fit In: high-skill, middle-skill, and line workers

Do you know where you fit in, in the labor force?

The labor force is no longer divided into the white-collar and blue-collar workers. It’s actually broken up into three categories:

High-Skilled: a college degree or higher

Middle-Skilled: associates degree or some college courses

Low-Line: high school diploma or GED

When you look closely at U.S. jobs and workers, we’re actually over capacity with high-skilled and low-skilled workers. In other words, there are not enough jobs to fill the demand for workers in the two categories. However, the opposite holds true for middle-skilled workers. As a nation, we don’t have enough workers to fill the demand for middle-skilled jobs. Continue reading

Ted Talks for Veterans in Transition: talk nerdy to me

There is an art in being able to explain yourself. Telling your story in a way that makes it compelling to an employer or interviewer is a skill to be mastered. Explaining your personal contribution and relevance to others doesn’t necessarily involve comprising your background and content but it does involve some self-awareness and delivery.

How can you effectively talk and communicate your way through an interview process? Melissa Marshall has some great tips… gone are the days of death by PowerPoint. Continue reading

The Down and Dirty: After the Resume

You can’t launch a job search without a great resume, but now that you’ve got a great one, you have to strategize about the next steps in your search. This process is oddly similar to dating: If you know what you’re looking for, you’re more likely to find it – target selectively! It also doesn’t hurt to have some great connections or wingmen in both of these processes so – network, network, network!

Targeting Selectively:
Scattershot is never the most effective way to conduct your job search. You’ll only exhaust yourself and get discouraged if you send tons of resumes to tons of employers. If you just randomly blanket the market with resumes, you’re going to get more rejections – no matter how awesome your resume is – because employers are wise to that kind of mass marketing. Think about those mass mail marketing pieces you find in your snail mail or those spam emails you get in your inbox. You likely don’t even open them. Employers won’t read past the first few lines if you are unfocused. So focus in on your true target, and your search will be more effective and less draining. Being targeted also comes across as more genuine and enthusiastic to potential employers. Think quality vs. quantity.

Consider your VIPS:
Values – We all have them, but we don’t always consider them in our job search. What’s most important to you in this life? Has this changed over time? How do you want to represent your values in your work?
Interests – What do you do in your free time? What makes you lose track of time you’re so interested in it? You love it so much, you’d do it for free if you could afford to.
Personality – Are you introverted or extroverted? Highly structured or a free-spirit? Do you possess the power of ‘WOO’ (Winning Others Over)?
Skills – We often know the most about this aspect of ourselves, but it’s not the only thing we should consider. Your skills are broader than just your job titles and duties. You likely have more skills than you even realize.

If you want assistance clarifying any of your VIPS, commonly used assessments available are: Sokanu, Myers-Briggs (MBTI), MyPlan, and Strengths Finder are just the tip of the iceberg. Often the assessments are available online, but avoid anything with a fee.

There are also many books available that coordinate with these assessments, if the printed page is more your style. Do What You Are and Strengths-Based Leadership are a couple great ones!

Interviews: your why, your story

Once you have a solid understanding of the breakdown and best practices in the interviewing process, you can begin to drill down to the more specific and detailed practices which can push you over the top. These vary from developing your story to mastering your non-verbals, and ultimately to honing your impromptu responses to standard – and surprise – questions.  

The Darden Alumni Career Services website has a very nicely organized set of tips and best practices that are highly effective and can be applied in just about any interviewing scenario. Having your own personal story down to a science is paramount to setting the tone for the interview. Continue reading

Interviews: best practices

In the first part of this series, Interviews: The Breakdown, we discussed the types of interviews and the basics of preparing for each type. Interviews are new to the transitioning veteran and are different based on the industry and type of business. Let’s explore some best practices once you introduce yourself to the interviewer.

Continue reading

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